How to obtain wild plants to make a “natural” garden

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How to obtain wild plants to make a “natural” garden
The easiest way is buying them, many of the plants you see in the field can be found for sale in nurseries: rosemary, lavender, sage, carraspique, thyme, mallows, junipers, equisetum, grasses, etc.

Collecting seeds, cuttings or even whole specimens is the other option. But beware: not anywhere, nor any plant. I am not an expert in legal or natural issues, but there are things that are common sense: I would never go to the natural park for rosemary cuttings, or bring me a plant on the edge of a road without knowing its invasive potential. There are some laws of forests, catalogs of invasive species, catalogs of protected species, royal decrees, municipal ordinances and a myriad of regulations that regulate what can and can not be done. This can also differ in each municipality, province, and country. It seems silly but you have to be careful.

Having said this and answering some questions that I have been asked, I tell you how I got a couple of wild species that I introduced into my garden, a euphorbia (Euphorbia segetalis) and a chamois (Asphodelus albus) from a neighboring plot. To begin with, I must say that I know the owner of the field from which I took it, which is a rustic, developable land, and I have his permission to collect wild from there. Whenever we go for a walk with our dog we do it in that area, from where I had previously bought some sedum cuttings.

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Sedum sediforme, silvestre

To be more likely to succeed, the ideal thing to do is to do the transplant in winter, before the plant restarts its life cycle. I did it at the end of February, after a few days of rain so that the soil was not too compact and hard. First, with the hoe, I was taking the earth around leaving a diameter somewhat higher than the aerial part of the plant and deepening as much as possible. Then, I stuck the shovel under the root ball and was prying until the earth gave way and the root ball came out: roots and dirt together.

Trasplantando una silvestre al jardín

The next thing is to go home as soon as possible to put the plants in pots full of a good substrate, water them and leave them in a sheltered place, well lit but protected from sun and drafts. It is not a transplant to use, from pot to pot, and the plants suffer a little, but if the roots have been well extracted, in a few days they resume their life cycle and become very beautiful.

 

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